The Maine Council for the Social Studies invite you to propose a workshop session for the 2018 MCSS Conference that will be held on October 22, 2018 at the Augusta Civic Center. The theme of the conference is: How Do You Teach in Today’s Climate: Social Studies Education in a Polarized World. We are looking for K-4, 5-8, and 9-12 educators and school specialists that are willing to share best practices and content knowledge in the areas of geography, economics, history, technology, global studies, civics, sociology, psychology, and humanities. Content teachers outside of the social studies are encouraged to submit interdisciplinary proposals that connect to the social studies.

Educators willing to share with their colleagues should click this LINK and fill out the RFP form by June 12, 2018. Conference presenters will be notified by the end of July.

Maine elementary school teachers are invited to propose a workshop that address one or more of the following questions or proposes a unique idea of their own creation:

How are you/elementary schools teaching about diversity? What critical reading strategies do you use that show multiple perspectives? What culturally diverse resources are you using and what are examples of successful strategies or activities you use that accompany them? What resources or classroom strategies are you using to teach about Wabanaki culture and history? How are you/elementary schools dealing with trauma in the classroom? What culturally appropriate strategies are you using in your elementary school classroom? How are you/elementary schools creating cooperative and respectful communities in the classroom and school? How are you and you interweaving contemporary divisive issues into standards based curriculum and lessons? What are examples of interdisciplinary lessons and strategies that you use that work well? What are you doing with technology in the classroom that relates to the social studies? What examples of effective classroom lessons, assessments, and tasks that are linked to proficiency standards do you have to share?

Maine middle school and high school teachers are invited to propose a workshop that addresses one or more of the following questions or proposes a topic of their unique creation:

How are you/secondary teachers teaching about implicit bias in state, national, and global communities? What strategies do you use in regards to media literacy and fake news? How do you teach about polarizing moments in history and foster respectful dialogue? How do you teach specific divisive topics from the past? How are you/secondary teachers teaching about the myriad of cultures who are living in and relocating to Maine? How are you linking historical content with contemporary issues in Maine like poverty, drug and alcohol abuse, racism, immigration, and intergenerational trauma? How are you/secondary teachers creating respectful classroom environments, safe places to debate and discuss challenging, polarizing and divisive topics? How are you/secondary teachers interweaving contemporary divisive issues into standards based curriculum and lessons? What are examples of interdisciplinary lessons and strategies that you use that work well? What are you doing with technology in the classroom that relates to the social studies? How do you use experiences gained from local, national, and international professional development programs in your classroom community? What examples of effective classroom lessons, assessments, and tasks that are linked to proficiency standards do you have to share?